‘Fake’ Spaghetti

Keeping my promise to Khalid, we are not having any carbs at night.

However, I was craving a Putanesca, so I went online and researched ‘spaghetti substitutes’.

The main ingredient I found being referenced, was European courgette.

Living in the UAE, 1-foot long courgettes are tough to come by. We do have smaller Middle Eastern courgettes, which we will include in a recipe in the future.

In searching for a spaghetti substitute, I stumbled across a large courgette-looking thing that I brought home to try something new.

The mysterious ingredient turned out to be Bottle Gourd, or “Lauki” in India. Other than the convenient shape, bottle gourd comes with a whole heap of nutritional benefits that can be found at the last link. My favourite being that it holds 12 calories per 100 grams!

So, onto the spaghetti.

Ingredients:
• 1 large Bottle Gourd
• 2 large Carrots
• 2-3 tbsp olive oil

Cooking method:
Use a julienne tool to ‘shave’ strips of the gourd and carrots. Try to go for long steady swipes, leaving you with evenly-sized spaghetti-looking strips.

Once everything is julienned, store in a container and prep a fine strainer over a bowl.

Preheat a wok or large frying pan to med-high, drop the olive oil in, and dump the julienned veggies in.

The mixture should start to sizzle and ‘sweat’. Stir the ‘spaghetti’ constantly for approximately 4 minutes, until the mixture starts to get the texture of al dente spaghetti.

Once done, place the cooked mixture into a strainer, over a bowl, allowing any excess moisture to drip out.

Voila! Fake Spaghetti!


Enjoy this with your favorite Bolognese, putanesca, or simply throw a few tablespoons of Paleo pesto (watch this space) in for a quick and healthy snack!

This is a version of fake spaghetti putanesca. Full recipe to come!

2 thoughts on “‘Fake’ Spaghetti

  1. If your gourd is still dripping water after cooking you need to salt it after julienning it and let it sit in a colander for 30 mins to an hour. The salt will extract the excess water and, in the case of eggplant, it takes some of the bitterness out too. Using a milder salt like kosher salt is good for this because it will dehydrate sufficiently without over-salting the taste.

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